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Oil major Shell to work with Microsoft for lower carbon emissions

Oil major Shell to work with Microsoft for lower carbon emissions

Oil major Shell and Microsoft, the tech giant, are embarking on a new strategic partnership to help progress toward a net-zero-emission.

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Shell announced its intentions to become a net-zero emission energy company by 2050 or sooner back in April 2020, alongside other oil majors such as BP and Equinor.

Shell and Microsoft said that their latest partnership builds on the solid base of the two companies' decades of technology collaboration.

This strategic partnership will help the vision of Shell to be a net-zero emission energy company in line with society and its customers by 2050, or sooner. The supply of renewable energy by Shell will help Microsoft achieve its targets for the supply of renewable energy and its wider goal to be carbon negative by 2050.

Over time, the collaboration is expected to make it possible for the two companies to do much more together.

Shell will supply Microsoft with renewable energy under the extended partnership, helping Microsoft fulfill its pledge to 100 percent renewable energy supply by 2025.

The two companies will continue to work together on artificial intelligence (AI), which has already accelerated change across the operations of Shell through access to real-time data insights, contributing to worker and on-site protection, and creating efficiencies that have helped reduce carbon emissions from Shell.

Shell and Microsoft will also work together to help advance the use of renewable aviation fuels, and businesses will use the Azure cloud computing framework and Shell asset data from Microsoft to enhance operational protection by enhancing risk identification, prediction and prevention.

Shell and Microsoft have partnered to create technologies that help to keep the employees and sites of Shell secure. Microsoft Azure, for example, powers the Autonomous Integrity Recognition (AIR) scheme of Shell, which uses image recognition algorithms to identify when corrosion is susceptible to equipment or parts of a site.

Maritime Business World 

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